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Lidocaine

From SNPedia

Lidocaine, also known as xylocaine and lignocaine, is a medication used to numb tissue in a specific area and to treat ventricular tachycardia. It can also be used for nerve blocks. Lidocaine mixed with a small amount of adrenaline (epinephrine) is available to allow larger doses for numbing, to decrease bleeding, and to make it last longer. When used as an injectable, it typically begins working within four minutes and lasts for half an hour to three hours. Lidocaine may also be applied directly to the skin for numbing.Wikipedia

The FDA-approved drug label for ORAQIX (lidocaine and prilocaine) states that patients with G6PD-deficiency are more susceptible to drug-induced methemoglobinemia, and that it should not be used in patients with congenital methemoglobinemia (cytochrome b5 reductase deficiency). NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase is encoded by the CYB5R1, CYB5R2, CYB5R3 and CYB5R4 genes.

PGx Table for Lidocaine (Oraqix)
Genotype/Genoset Diplotype Gene Drug Use/Category/Class Medical Field Summary Descriptive Sentence
gs309 WT/WT G6PD Anesthetic Anesthesiology Normal Response Expected You do not appear to carry any G6PD mutations linked to an unwanted side effect (methemoglobinemia).
gs307 Carrier G6PD Anesthetic Anesthesiology Use with Caution You carry a G6PD mutation that might lead to an unwanted side effect (methemoglobinemia) when taking lidocaine; due to variable expression (i.e. in females), enzymatic testing for G6PD activity may be advisable.
gs308 G6PD-deficient G6PD Anesthetic Anesthesiology Use with Caution You carry a G6PD mutation linked to an unwanted side effect (methemoglobinemia) when taking lidocaine; use with caution.